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Updated: 54 min 34 sec ago

Stopping A ‘Wisconsin Moment’ in Connecticut

2 hours 54 min ago

“How ya’ll doing?” AFSCME President Lee Saunders asked as he  walked into the Bridgeport, Conn., water treatment plant garage where workers were coming in on a shift change.

Saunders was there to talk to members about “the most important election in your lifetime.” Earlier, at the other end of the city, he met with four groups of lunching state social service case workers and clericals from Council 4 bargaining units totaling more than 1,100 members, discussing the danger to their jobs and bargaining rights if they allowed a rich extremist to deliver on his promise to bring a “Wisconsin moment” to Connecticut.

“You know what a ‘Wisconsin Moment’ means?” he asked a group of West Haven, Conn., municipal and board of education workers later that day. “It means we are stripped of our voice and our rights. That’s what [Republican gubernatorial candidate] Tom Foley wants to deliver here in Connecticut.” Foley is running against incumbent Dan Malloy. Nodding in agreement was West Haven Mayor Ed O’Brien, the son of a former West Haven police officer and member of AFSCME Council 15, who was on hand to thank the municipal employees and their union for working with him to reach a fair collective bargaining agreement.

It was the public safety officers of AFSCME Council 15 and their affiliate, AFSCME Local 724, who sponsored the raucous rally in New London the day before. Surrounded by labor leaders, Mayor Daryl Justin Finizio of New London declared that his city was a “union town,” a fact on display all along a downtown intersection – signs from AFSCME, the UAW, Fire Fighters, Iron Workers, Carpenters, SEIU, the Teamsters, American Federation of Teachers and the Amalgamated Transit Union, among others.

Saunders looked out upon the horde of labor supporters and declared, “The rights we have didn’t fall from the sky. We got them because we fought for them! And we have to fight to keep them.”

At every stop, Saunders reminded workers that they have the power. This election is in our hands. If we turn out the vote of people who share our values, who want to preserve the middle class, who care about quality public services, then we will win. “Bad things happen when good people stay away from the polls,” he said.

At the water treatment plant in Bridgeport, where the workers had struggled for several years to finally win a good contract with an English company trying to maximize its profit at the city’s water waste treatment facility, Saunders was blunt.

“Whether we keep our rights and our jobs comes down to whether we have political leaders who care about us and our jobs,” he said. “We know that with Tom Foley, we may be cut out entirely – just like we were in Wisconsin. We can’t afford to allow that to happen in Connecticut. We have to talk to our friends, our families, people we know care about working families. Those one-on-one conversations will make the difference.”

The next day, Saunders helped kick off a “Labor Walk” at the Teachers’ union hall in Meriden, Conn. , sponsored by the AFL-CIO. Then, after the whirlwind tour to rally the troops in Connecticut, Saunders was off to Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Michigan, Florida and other states where labor may tip the balance. Three weeks to go, so much work to do. As he told Council 4 members at every stop, “We’ve got to be prepared to work this election as if the future truly depends on it. Because, sisters and brothers, it does.”

Categories: News By Union

AFSCME Stands with Wal-Mart Workers Who Demand a Living Wage

2 hours 54 min ago

With $473 billion in worldwide sales just last year, you would think that Wal-Mart could pony up a living wage to its employees. But its 1.3 million employees in the United States are scraping by on poverty wages with no benefits and irregular hours, even as the six members of the Walton family are worth $145 billion from Wal-Mart profits. 

That’s why Wal-Mart workers and their allies, including AFSCME, marched to the offices of the Walton Family Foundation in New York City and Washington, D.C., Oct. 16. They had a simple request for the Walton family: $15 an hour and full-time hours.

“We must send the message that we refuse to live in a low-wage part-time economy driven by the Waltons’ profits,” D.C. Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton told the crowd.

Marchers shut down traffic in front of the offices, but the foundation refused to meet and hear their demands. The Walton Family Foundation is an organization established to create the appearance that the Wal-Mart founders are charitable with their wealth. But Forbes magazine describes the charity as a form of tax dodge. It spends most of its money on education “reform” designed to replace our schools and teachers with corporate charters.

Wal-Mart’s wealthy bosses could do a whole lot more if they chose to share the company’s profits with the people who work to make it happen. Those workers desperately need a living wage and stable schedules that allow them to spend time with their families. 

Unfortunately, Wal-Mart’s inhumane employment practices set the pattern for other employers. That’s why unions are working to change Wal-Mart, to help working families.

Categories: News By Union

Walker: Minimum Wage Serves No Purpose

Thu, 10/16/2014 - 17:47

MADISON, Wis. – After avoiding the question in his first debate with Wisconsin gubernatorial candidate Mary Burke, Gov. Scott Walker finally offered an answer during a live broadcast of his sit-down with the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

“What is your position on the minimum wage?” asked columnist Dan Bice. “Should we have it?”

“Well, I’m not going to repeal it, but I don’t think it serves a purpose,” Walker responded.

While the facts paint a clear picture that raising the minimum wage would boost earnings for 16 million people and bring 900,000 Americans out of poverty, Walker once again stands against middle-class values and on the wrong side of history.

According to a poll conducted by the Marquette University Law School, 59 percent of Wisconsinites support increasing the minimum wage.

Walker’s latest flub comes only days after his first debate with challenger Mary Burke during which, when asked about Wisconsin’s lack of job growth compared to the rest of the Midwest, Walker responded that the state “doesn’t have a jobs problem, we have a work problem.”

Agree to disagree, Governor.  You might think sitting last in the Midwest for job growth is acceptable, but to the people of Wisconsin, last in the Midwest and 35th in the nation isn’t cutting it.

Categories: News By Union

Court Backs Voting Rights in Wisconsin

Thu, 10/16/2014 - 17:29

The U.S. Supreme Court, in a case involving Gov. Scott Walker’s 2011 voter suppression law, slapped down efforts by lawmakers to limit who can vote. 

Governor Walker’s 2011 law was designed to ensure his own re-election, and the election of other anti-worker candidates by restricting the turnout of groups of voters less likely to vote for them, especially minorities and young people, who cannot provide certain types of identification.

A congressional study of voter ID laws, issued last week, compared voter ID laws in Kansas and Tennessee to four states that lacked those restrictions and concluded that such laws reduced voter turnout by as much as 3 percent. 

“GAO’s analysis suggests that the turnout decreases in Kansas and Tennessee beyond decreases in the comparison states were attributable to changes in those two states’ voter ID requirements,” the report said.

Extremist lawmakers like Governor Walker argue that such laws are aimed at preventing voter fraud, but there is little evidence of voter fraud in Wisconsin or nationwide. U.S. District Judge Lynn Adelman concluded this April that “virtually no voter impersonation occurs in Wisconsin. The defendants could not point to a single instance of known voter impersonation occurring in Wisconsin at any time in the recent past,” or was likely to “become a problem at any time in the foreseeable future.”

Judge Adelman ruled at that time that Governor Walker’s voting restrictions violated both the equal-protection clause of the Constitution and the Voting Rights Act. The 6-3 decision of the U.S. Supreme Court upheld Adelman’s ruling, effectively blocking the law.

The Wisconsin ruling came on the same day that a federal judge in Texas struck down that state’s restrictive voter ID law as unconstitutional. U.S. District Court Judge Nelva Gonzales-Ramos wrote that those legislators who pushed the law “were motivated, at the very least in part, because of and not merely in spite of the voter ID law’s detrimental effects on the African-American and Hispanic electorate.”

Unfortunately, a federal appeals court reinstated the Texas voter-ID law for the November election. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit did not rule on the law’s merits, so there is still hope that, eventually, it will be overturned as the case moves up the legal ladder.

Categories: News By Union

Courts Back Voting Rights in Wisconsin, Texas

Thu, 10/16/2014 - 17:29

Two court decisions, one by the U.S. Supreme Court in a case involving Gov. Scott Walker’s 2011 voter suppression law, and another case in Texas also striking down a restrictive voter ID law, slapped down efforts by lawmakers to limit who can vote in those states. 

Governor Walker’s 2011 law was designed to ensure his own re-election, and the election of other anti-worker candidates by restricting the turnout of groups of voters less likely to vote for them, especially minorities and young people, who cannot provide certain types of identification.

A congressional study of voter ID laws, issued last week, compared voter ID laws in Kansas and Tennessee to four states that lacked those restrictions and concluded that such laws reduced voter turnout by as much as 3 percent. 

“GAO’s analysis suggests that the turnout decreases in Kansas and Tennessee beyond decreases in the comparison states were attributable to changes in those two states’ voter ID requirements,” the report said.

Extremist lawmakers like Governor Walker argue that such laws are aimed at preventing voter fraud, but there is little evidence of voter fraud in Wisconsin or nationwide. U.S. District Judge Lynn Adelman concluded this April that “virtually no voter impersonation occurs in Wisconsin. The defendants could not point to a single instance of known voter impersonation occurring in Wisconsin at any time in the recent past,” or was likely to “become a problem at any time in the foreseeable future.”

Judge Adelman ruled at that time that Governor Walker’s voting restrictions violated both the equal-protection clause of the Constitution and the Voting Rights Act. The 6-3 decision of the U.S. Supreme Court upheld Adelman’s ruling, effectively blocking the law.

The Wisconsin ruling came on the same day that a federal judge in Texas struck down that state’s restrictive voter ID law as unconstitutional. U.S. District Court Judge Nelva Gonzales-Ramos wrote that those legislators who pushed the law “were motivated, at the very least in part, because of and not merely in spite of the voter ID law’s detrimental effects on the African-American and Hispanic electorate.”

Categories: News By Union

Unions Make Sense for New Orleans Tourism Industry

Thu, 10/16/2014 - 09:00

NEW ORLEANS – In a historic win for New Orleans hospitality workers, 900 Harrah’s Hotel and Casino employees are now in contract negotiations after winning the right to organize with UNITE HERE and the Teamsters through successful card-check campaigns.

It was also a win for union conventioneers, since previously the only other unionized hotel in New Orleans was the Loews Hotel. The addition of Harrah’s workers doubled the city’s hospitality industry union membership. Still, there are more than 70,000 New Orleanians employed in the industry.  

In 2013, more than 9 million visitors came to New Orleans, spending $6 billion in the process. With the addition of a new unionized hotel, revenues are likely to increase with additional union functions, AFSCME Pres. Lee Saunders pointed out in a letter this summer to the president of Hilton International, whose Riverside property in New Orleans is being organized by UNITE HERE.

Much like New Orleans Cab Drivers for Justice AFSCME Local 234, these newly unionized hospitality workers hope to create a stronger tourism industry and also better their working conditions.

“Just like us cab drivers, hotel and food service workers help keep New Orleans’ tourism industry up and running,” said Delores Montgomery, president of AFSCME Local 234. “Having a union will enable them to fight back against mistreatment and abuse. More and more workers in the tourism industry are joining unions and when we stand together, we’re going to be unstoppable!”

Unlike other U.S. cities with large tourism revenues – such as Chicago, New York and Las Vegas – New Orleans’ union membership in the hospitality industry remains low. The industry stands to benefit if hotel owners respect their employees’ efforts to unionize. 

Categories: News By Union